Dasman Diabetes Institute invited all healthcare professionals in Kuwait to attend a lecture entitled “Insulin Resistance – A Ghost of an Idea”, which was presented by Professor David Matthews, MA (Oxon), DPhil, BM, BCh, FRCP, Professor of Diabetic Medicine, University of Oxford. The lecture was held on Tuesday 8th February 2011 at Dasman Diabetes Institute.

Dasman Diabetes Institute invited all healthcare professionals in Kuwait to attend a lecture entitled “Insulin Resistance – A Ghost of an Idea”, which was presented by Professor David Matthews, MA (Oxon), DPhil, BM, BCh, FRCP, Professor of Diabetic Medicine, University of Oxford. The lecture was held on Tuesday 8th February 2011 at Dasman Diabetes Institute.
Prof. Matthews in his lecture mentioned that “Insulin is a strange hormone. In health it is secreted primarily as a function of falling glucose concentration but is under remarkable constraint and seems to signal a multiplicity of modalities. It is clear that insulin signals hepatic output, muscle and fat glucose uptake, some aspects of triglyceride handling, and the vascular activity of hormone sensitive lipase. With so many dependencies it is remarkable that energy substrates normally seem to be under such good homeostatic control. How is this complexity achieved with one hormone? Some of the answers are beginning to emerge. Aspects of insulin action in man relate to its concentration while others relate to the dynamics of its secretion. Individual cells within the body are not uniformly sensitive to insulin and the sum total of their sensitivity (or lack of it) is what we have termed insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is therefore not a single entity but a highly complex synthesis of cellular modalities. It is not therefore surprising, though it is remarkable, that therapeutic insulin requirements in diabetes may range from about 4 to 400 units daily (i.e. two orders of magnitude difference). Thus one of the central problems of the therapeutics of insulin is that the dose is so variable between individuals. With such complexity it seems remarkable that insulin replacement therapy can work at all, though experience tells us that it certainly does! However insulin replacement will always be an estimate until we solve the problem of modulated delivery based on glucose and lipid concentrations. That solution may be conventionally engineered or bio engineered.”

The lecture was followed by distribution of CME credited certificates of attendance to the audience.