Prof. Manuel Carballo, Executive Director, International Centre for Migration and Health (ICMH), Switzerland was invited to present a lecture on Human Mobility and Health at Dasman Diabetes Institute. The lecture took place on Thursday, 10th February 2011.

Prof. Carballo pointed out in his lecture that “People have always been moving but in the past twenty or so years, the pace and scope of human mobility has accelerated exponentially and today more people are moving faster and further than ever before. Some are moving from the country side to cities; others are moving from one country to another. In all, approximately one billion people are defined as being on the move. Some are moving to study; others are moving to work; still others are being displaced by a mix of man-made and natural disasters”.

Prof. Manuel Carballo, Executive Director, International Centre for Migration and Health (ICMH), Switzerland was invited to present a lecture on Human Mobility and Health at Dasman Diabetes Institute. The lecture took place on Thursday, 10th February 2011.

Prof. Carballo pointed out in his lecture that “People have always been moving but in the past twenty or so years, the pace and scope of human mobility has accelerated exponentially and today more people are moving faster and further than ever before. Some are moving from the country side to cities; others are moving from one country to another. In all, approximately one billion people are defined as being on the move. Some are moving to study; others are moving to work; still others are being displaced by a mix of man-made and natural disasters”.

Prof. Carballo also commented that “Human mobility is a complex process, however, and mobility can bring with it numerous health implications that extend to both communicable and non-communicable diseases. Understanding the interaction between mobility and health, health care needs, and health care system responses is essential to the health planning process and to knowing when and what to focus on from a prevention, diagnosis and treatment perspective. Research on this dynamic interaction is growing but much remains to be done both nationally and internationally”.

This lecture was attended by many personalities from the health sector and academic institutions in Kuwait. The lecture was followed by presentation of certificates of attendance with CME credits.