A lecture entitled “Global Public Health and the Future of Epidemiology” was presented at Dasman Diabetes Institute by Prof. Peter Boyle, from the International Prevention Research Institute, in France. The lecture was held on Tuesday 15th February 2011. During his lecture, Prof. Boyle mentioned that “There are approximately 60 million deaths globally each year. Half of these deaths involve people less than 60 years of age and one death in five is in a child under five years of age. Most of these deaths in children are avoidable: over 90% are due to diarrhea, bronchiolytis or measles and the majority occurs in lower resource countries. A lecture entitled Global Public Health and the Future of Epidemiology was presented at Dasman Diabetes Institute by Prof. Peter Boyle, from the International Prevention Research Institute, in France. The lecture was held on Tuesday 15th February 2011. During his lecture, Prof. Boyle mentioned that: There are approximately 60 million deaths globally each year. Half of these deaths involve people less than 60 years of age and one death in five is in a child under five years of age. Most of these deaths in children are avoidable: over 90% are due to diarrhea, bronchiolytis or measles and the majority occurs in lower resource countries. Prof. Boyle also added that: Epidemiological approaches have rendered many diseases and deaths avoidable. For example, Semmelweis identified effective ways to eliminate Puerperal Fever which served to reduce many deaths among women as a result of childbirth. Richard Doll identified tobacco smoking as a major cause of several diseases and reduced life expectancy. Deaths from tobacco smoking are completely avoidable. Lung cancer was a rare disease at the start of the 20th Century: it is now the commonest cause of cancer death worldwide. Over 80% of adult men in the United Kingdom smoked cigarettes in 1950: one quarter of men born in Scotland between 1900 and 1910 died of lung cancer. If current trends continue, there will be one billion persons who will die this century as a direct result of smoking tobacco. Prof. Boyle mentioned that: Life expectancy continues to increase although the 7 year difference in life expectancy in men between old Europe and new Europe is a real cause for concern. While life expectancy approaches 80 years for men and women, healthy life expectancy (life expectancy without disability) rarely exceeds 65 years in European Union countries. For French and German men, the great European Wars of the early 20th Century ate up all the increased life expectancy gained from the rapid advances in health in the first half of the century. Cigarette smoking ate up all the gains made through health developments in smokers in the second half of the century Prof. Boyle as well commented that: There are many ways to increase life expectancy around the world: avoid catastrophic war, famine, pestilence, social collapse; implement what is known to reduce disease risk; and make effective treatments progressively more widely accessible worldwide. The major difficulty to overcome urgently is associated with the growth of the global population from 6.5 billion today to 8 billion in twenty years time. How to feed and provide water and sanitation for this expanded population are great challenges as is the provision of adequate health care. At the end of his lecture, Prof. Boyle stated that The 17th Century could be characterised as the century of bacteriology; the 19th century that of vaccination and the 20th century that of pharmaceuticals. Within our current knowledge, one half of deaths in middle age (35-69) are preventable. Given the enormous Public Health problems facing the world this century, we should strive to make this 21st Century that of Prevention. After all, Prevention avoids the labour of being sick. The lecture was very well attended by many healthcare professionals from different hospitals, clinics and academic institutions in Kuwait. The lecture was followed by distribution of CME credited certificates of attendance.