Dasman Diabetes Institute hosted Dr. Elia Stupka, Scientific Director, Bioinformatics of UCL Genomics, University College London. Faculty at University College London, London, United Kingdom.  Dr. Stupka presented a lecture entitled “Do we understand enough about genome to build next generation molecular networks of disease?”, on 1st of February 2011 at the Dasman Diabetes Institute’s Auditorium.

Dasman Diabetes Institute hosted Dr. Elia Stupka, Scientific Director, Bioinformatics of UCL Genomics, University College London. Faculty at University College London, London, United Kingdom.  Dr. Stupka presented a lecture entitled “Do we understand enough about genome to build next generation molecular networks of disease?”, on 1st of February 2011 at the Dasman Diabetes Institute’s Auditorium.

Dr. Stupka mentioned in his lecture that over the last ten years genomics has been used extensively to attempt to unravel how genomic information is linked to predisposition and progression to disease. The results, however, have been rather disappointing.  Large-scale approaches, such as Genome Wide Association studies using SNP microarrays, have only explained a small percentage of the heritability of disease. Drawing from examples from our own research, as well as wider research taking place across the London genomics community, Dr. Stupka also gave some potential reasons for why past approaches have failed as well as how these shortcomings can be overcome. He stated that, since the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, genomics has been transformed, allowing us to obtain quantitative, unbiased, genome-wide data. Importantly the same technology can now be used to assess genetic, epigenetic and expression changes, providing a unified and unprecedented view of molecular networks underlying disease.  In addition, Dr. Stupka commented that, this approach allows us to go well beyond the traditional notion of “genes vs. junk”, to understand how any element in the genome, be it a repeat element, a non-coding RNA, and enhancer, or an alternative transcript, are part of a pathological molecular network.

Medical and healthcare professionals from various hospitals and clinics attended this lecture.  CME credited certificates of attendance were passed out at the end of the lecture.