Dasman Diabetes Institute in collaboration with The Forsyth Institute in USA organized a lecture entitled “Diabetes Mellitus: Periodontal Disease and Mechanism of Inflammation”. The lecture was presented at Dasman Diabetes Institute on Monday 21st of February 2011, by Dr. Hatice Hasturk, Associate Research Investigator from The Forsyth Institute in USA.asman Diabetes Institute in collaboration with The Forsyth Institute in USA organized a lecture entitled Diabetes Mellitus: Periodontal Disease and Mechanism of Inflammation&quot. The lecture was presented at Dasman Diabetes Institute on Monday 21st of February 2011, by Dr. Hatice Hasturk, Associate Research Investigator from The Forsyth Institute in USA. In her lecture, Dr. Hasturk highlighted that Type 2 diabetes achieved proportions of a real epidemic and, according to the International Diabetes Federation, the disease now affects 246 million people worldwide and is expected to affect about 380 million by 2025. The incidence/prevalence of serious diabetic complications (which includes cardiovascular disease, kidney failure, blindness and amputations) as well as the premature death will unequivocally deteriorate life quality and exacerbate health costs. A team approach has become a necessity to effectively manage the diabetic patients and to prevent serious diabetic complications, which are the major causes for life-threatening conditions in diabetes. Chronic periodontitis results from extension of the inflammatory process initiated by bacteria in the gingiva to the supporting periodontal tissues. An abundance of information accumulated from studies on the complications of diabetes and periodontal disease has revealed that a hyperactive innate immune response may be the antecedent of both diseases, which probably have a synergistic effect when they coexist in the host. Dr. Hasturk also added that, hence, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease is reciprocal. Infections, including periodontal infections, have a significant impact on diabetic control and can be a leading factor for more serious diabetic complications. Conversely, diabetes is a significant risk factor for the development of periodontal disease and can aggravate the severity of periodontal infections. New data from our group and others suggest that the PMN/mononuclear phagocytes become primed during diabetes and release mediators that promote the tissue damage associated with periodontitis. The lecture was very well attended by many diabetologists, dentists, and other healthcare professionals in Kuwait. The lecture was followed by distribution of CME credited certificates of attendance to the audience.